Creative Access Fellowship

 

Applications for the 2019 Fellowship are now closed, the 2020 Fellowship applications will be open in June, 2019.


SFAI is proud to support visual artists & writers with spinal cord injuries (SCI) through a the Creative Access Fellowship. Creative Access offers US and Canadian visual artists and writers with spinal cord injury the rare opportunity for concentrated time dedicated to their creative practice in a supportive residency community. Twelve awardees will receive the invaluable opportunity of between a 2-8 week residency at one of the four host sites, including room and board, a $1000 stipend, and travel award for a personal assistant/caregiver if needed.

Since 2009, the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation has partnered with the Vermont Studio Center (VSC) to support visual artists and writers with spinal cord injury (SCI) with residency fellowships. In 2017, the Creative Access Fellowships Program – in partnership with the Alliance of Artists Communities – expanded to include 12 residency stays at four host sites: Vermont Studio Center (Johnson, VT), PLAYA (Summerlake, OR), Ragdale Foundation (Lake Forest, IL), and Santa Fe Art Institute (Santa Fe, NM), selected for their accessible facilities, innovative programming, and reputations for excellence. Application and selection for the Creative Access residencies are facilitated by the Alliance of Artists Communities.

 

Katie Green

Katie Green’s artistic practice focuses on visual arts in the form of painting/drawing, large-scale mural installations, and most recently mask and puppetry. Green is interested in how public work alters the landscape of an individual’s community, not only through the physical transformation of a mundane object (may it be a wall or a structure), but more importantly through the way the public constructs that community in their minds.

For the past five years, Green’s professional artistic endeavours have been focused primarily on murals, both locally and internationally. Her process often includes community-driven workshops to develop content and teach mural painting techniques. This has helped Green build a deeper consideration of how her artistic practice integrates into spaces where there is a shared viewership between artist and public.

Through Green’s recent investigation into mask making and puppetry, she has become further interested in deepening the relational aspects of her work by layering visual art with performative practice. Rather than exploring ‘performance’ literally as a presentation in a theatre, she is interested in investigating the different forms of interactivity that take place when I both build and embody a puppet or mask. Green is curious to explore how mask making and puppetry can expand her public art practice beyond murals into one where performance becomes a key component in creating a multifaceted relationship with the public she is engaging.

 


David McCauley

David McCauley is a mixed media artist based in Miami, FL. His work blends design, sculpture, typography, and repurposed materials. McCauley’s urban contemporary artwork is held in prestigious private collections worldwide and has been featured internationally in solo and group exhibitions with such institutions as Art Basel Miami Beach, UBS Planet Art, SCOPE Art Show, Galerie Lano (Paris), Cheryl Hazan Gallery (NYC), Projective Space (NYC), and The Richmond Art Museum. David has held artist residencies at The Art Center South Florida (Miami Beach), YO Space (Miami), the Vermont Studio Center (Johnson, VT), and the Laundromat Art Space (Miami).

McCauley is the founder of The Rise Up Gallery and The Little Haiti Laundromat Art Space. Both 501c3 non profit organizations have been awarded numerous accolades for their programs which provide art therapy workshops to the community and studio/exhibition space for artists.

 


Jennifer Radil

Jennifer Radil combines ephemera, illustration and painting to create art inspired by the unique, place-based connectivity of ecological and social systems. She uses vintage maps, paint, pencils, and coiled string to create collaged topographical maps unlike those found in any atlas. Jennifer incorporates antique atlas entries and Federal censuses with wet and dry media to create original works on paper, wood, and vellum. Layering materials is a key part of her process. Inspiration comes from geological formations like the rugged badlands of western Nebraska and South Dakota, whose exposed sedimentary layers show the effects of water and wind over millions of years; or interiors, where layers of wallpaper each tell a story about a space’s former inhabitants.

Radil’s most recent work pairs portraiture with cartography as a study of identity formation; her current commission features a drawing of an eighteen year-old set against a map of the Boston suburb where she was raised. Her hair and clothing begin to blend into the nineteenth-century map of Framingham (which includes the location of her childhood home) so that it becomes difficult to separate the young woman from the place where she came of age.

Jennifer studied studio art at Colorado College and she completed her graduate work in art therapy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. A registered art therapist and teaching artist, jennifer balances facilitating creative opportunities for others with creating her own work out of her studio in Omaha. This is her first residency.