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Tom Joyce – July 13 Lecture | July 14 Forge Demo and Bastille Celebration

Artist, Designer, Blacksmith Tom Joyce
Lecture and Forge Demonstration

©2005 Tom Joyce "Quoin" Wood, books, iron 48" x 48"x 41"

©2005 Tom Joyce “Quoin” Wood, books, iron 48″ x 48″x 41″

July 13, 2009 @ 6pm, Tom Joyce Lecture, Tipton Hall
$5 General Public, $2.50 students/seniors/SFAI members

July 14, 2009 @ 10am-12pm,  Tom Joyce Forge Demonstration & Bastille Day Celebration
Tom Joyce’s Studio, $50 includes forge demo and pastries & coffee in celebration of Bastille Day
info: 505 424 50505

The Santa Fe Art Institute is pleased to bring you Santa Fe based artist, designer, and blacksmith, Tom Joyce as part of our 2009 Visiting Artist & Lecture season, Memory: Shadow and Light | Art as individual/collective memory. Join us for his lecture on Monday, July 13th, and for a forge demonstration on Tuesday, July 14th, that will serve as a fundraiser for the Santa Fe Art Institute.

Tom Joyce is an artist, designer, and blacksmith, who since 1977 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, has forged sculpture, architectural ironwork and public art for projects throughout the United States. Joyce infuses many of these works with meaning by celebrating the inherited histories represented by the material he uses.  In both public and private commissions, he encourages community members to participate in the making process by donating ferrous materials discarded in and collected from the landscape or particular iron objects that hold significance to the owner. From the Rio Grande Gates, forged from refuse retrieved from the river for the Albuquerque Museum of Art, to massive iron sculptures forged from industrial scrap, Joyce continues to re-examine the social, political, economic and historical implications of using iron in his work.

For more information, images, or interview requests, please contact Michelle Laflamme-Childs at Tom Joyce is an artist, designer, and blacksmith, who since 1977 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, has forged sculpture, architectural ironwork and public art for projects throughout the United States. Joyce infuses many of these works with meaning by celebrating the inherited histories represented by the material he uses.  In both public and private commissions, he encourages community members to participate in the making process by donating ferrous materials discarded in and collected from the landscape or particular iron objects that hold significance to the owner. From the Rio Grande Gates, forged from refuse retrieved from the river for the Albuquerque Museum of Art, to massive iron sculptures forged from industrial scrap, Joyce continues to re-examine the social, political, economic and historical implications of using iron in his work.

For more information, images, or interview requests, please contact Michelle Laflamme-Childs at mchilds@sfai.org or call (505) 424-5050.

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